Protect Your Lake – Protect Your Investment – Septic System Handbook – Courtesy of Fairbank Lake Camp Owner’s Association

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Greater Sudbury is the “City of Lakes” and many people living on waterfront properties are dedicated to protecting the water quality around their homes. Recently, several lakes in the Sudbury area have developed blue/green algae blooms affecting drinking water and closing beaches.

Some of the causes of algae blooms are faulty septic systems, storm water run-off and increased levels of phosphorus and nitrogen.

Read more

Development and Application of a Water Quality Model for Lakes in the City of Greater Sudbury – Hutchinson Report

Excerpt:

The Vermilion River Stewardship (VRS) wish to express our concerns regarding the recent report entitled, “Development and Application of a Water Quality Model for Lakes in the City of Greater Sudbury” (Report), by Hutchinson Environmental Sciences Inc. We understand that this report was initiated in late 2011 for the development of a watershed-based water quality model for the City of Greater Sudbury using the Lakeshore Capacity Model.

We have had an opportunity to review this Report in detail, and feel that it falls far short of its purpose, which is to provide technical guidance for the development and redevelopment of unserviced shoreline lots in support of Official Plan policies that are protective of water quality, technically sound, defensible, and which meet the intent of the Provincial Water Quality Objectives (PWQO) and Provincial Policy Statement. Our areas of concern are as follows:  Read more

Sudbury needs better model to evaluate lake health, manager says – Morning North, CBC Radio

 

Simon Lake - Park

Simon Lake – Park

Mar 25, 2014 10:11 AM ET

The City of Greater Sudbury says it has started a long process toward more safeguards for city lakes, including how it can more accurately pinpoint water quality.

At a meeting Monday night, Sudbury’s environmental planning manager gave his report on lake quality. One of the big problems, he said, is the guide used by the province to determine water quality doesn’t work very well….  Read the full article and listen to the interview:

Sudbury needs better model to evaluate lake health, manager says

RELATED CONTENT BELOW:

Sudbury Lake Water Quality Report – Vermilion River Stewardship’s letters of concern

Posted:  25 March 2014

Sudbury lakes report questioned over omissions

Posted: Mar 24, 2014 1:37 PM ET

Posted: Feb 21, 2014 9:06 AM ET

Sudbury Lake Water Quality Model Report

Blue-green algae on Ella Lake - November 2012

Blue-green algae on Ella Lake in November of 2012

Excerpt:  We have had an opportunity to review this Report in detail, and feel that it falls far short of its purpose, which is to provide technical guidance for the development and redevelopment of unserviced shoreline lots in support of Official Plan policies that are protective of water quality, technically sound, defensible, and which meet the intent of the Provincial Water Quality Objectives (PWQO) and Provincial Policy Statement.

To view the Lake Water Quality Model Report in a PDF document click here.

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2014-03-22-VRStoCGS-HutchinsonReport

Lively/Walden Wastewater Treatment System – Part II Order Request

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Algae on Simon Lake – Lively, Ontario

The City of Greater Sudbury is proposing to decommission the Lively Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) and upgrade the Walden WWTP.  Vermilion River Stewardship (VRS) has requested tertiary treatment, which is a third means of effluent treatment, to improve water quality on the lower Junction Creek, Simon Lake, McCharles Lake, and the lower Vermilion River.  VRS is making a request to the Minister of Environment to issue a Part II Order to elevate this proposal to an Individual Environmental Assessment.  See attached letter – Click to Download.

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Park Beach on Simon Lake

Protect Your Shoreline, Protect Your Beach – Water Conservation Tips

News Release

Protect Your Shoreline, Protect Your Beach

Water Conservation Tips for Property Owners and Cottagers

Ministry of the Environment

Do your part to preserve Ontario’s beaches and lakes during the summer months.

Shorelines are natural buffers that help prevent pollution and protect water quality. Here are some simple water conservation ideas you can do to keep them healthy:

  • Divert downspouts into rain barrels to water your garden.
  • Restore natural shorelines by planting native vegetation.
  • Make sure your natural shoreline buffer is at least three metres from the water’s edge. The wider, the better.
  • Avoid raking yard waste into the lake, rivers, streams or wetlands.
  • Use fertilizers that are phosphorus-free.
  • Stoop and scoop. Rainstorms and runoff can carry animal waste into rivers and lakes.

Protecting and restoring freshwater shorelines is part of the Ontario government’s plan to enhance quality of life for Ontario families and ensure a strong, green economy for future generations.

Quick Facts

  • There are 100,000 cottages near the shoreline of the Great Lakes.
  • Ontario’s Great Lakes form the longest freshwater coastline in the world stretching more than 11,000 kilometres.
  • The five Great Lakes and their connecting rivers form the largest surface fresh water system, and the largest readily available source of fresh water – 20% of the planet’s supply.

Quotes

Jim Bradley

Summer is more fun when the water is drinkable, swimmable and fishable. By taking a few simple steps, cottagers can protect water quality at their properties.”

Jim Bradley

Minister of the Environment

Interview by Vocal Vibes – Deep Waters

Deep Waters – the latest edition of Vocal Vibes Podcast

Vocal Vibes recently interviewed Linda Heron, Chair of the Vermilion River Stewardship and the Ontario Rivers Alliance.

We all live in a watershed.  That’s not something most North Americans think about, even though we turn on our taps many times a day, wash our cars, fertilize our lawns, or throw away toxic substances.  The Deep Waters edition of Vocal Vibes dives into water quality, a type of bloom that you don’t want, and small victories.

Click here to listen to the interview.

Ella Lake - Blue-green Algae Bloom

Ella Lake – Blue-green Algae Bloom

 

Local Water Stewards Appeal to City of Greater Sudbury

Council of the City of Greater Sudbury
P.O. Box 5000 Station A
200 Brady Street
Sudbury ON P3A 5P3

May 9, 2013

Dear Members of Council of the City of Greater Sudbury

As local water stewards, environmental organizations, and community groups, we would like to express our strong support for the proposed motion to immediately begin work on watershed studies. Watershed studies are fundamental to healthy, swimmable, drinkable, fishable, and sustainable lakes and waterways in Greater Sudbury. These studies are needed to make informed decisions that take into account the big picture, and assess the cumulative impacts of development. Much of the background work has already been done – now is the time to complete these studies.

Water quality is a top priority and concern for residents in our ‘City of Lakes’. Enjoyment of our lakes and waterways, and access to safe drinking water, are essential to our community. Watershed studies provide the basic information needed to make appropriate planning decisions when it comes to water quality, and to protecting residents from flooding hazards. This is why water stewards have consistently called for the need for watershed studies to be completed before development decisions are made. Read more

Green Energy be Dammed!

We all want green energy, but let’s ensure it is truly green.

Wabagishik Rapids is a beautiful 1 km stretch of rapids on the Vermilion River, about 1/2 hour west of Sudbury, Ontario.  A developer is proposing to build a modified peaking hydroelectric dam that would only produce enough power to supply about 1,600 homes.  These types of dams have numerous negative impacts associated with them, and are very harmful to the riverine ecosystem.  Check out this film to find out more.